Archives for April 2012

Live Painting with Wyland –May 3rd and 4th 2012


 

 

The Arts and Culture Council, in conjunction with the Wyland Foundation, is preparing a unique live painting experience – the Wyland Art Mural Project of Miami Beach.  On Thursday May 3rd and Friday May 4th, internationally acclaimed artist and conservationist, Wyland, will mentor the Miami Beach Public School Students with the live painting of a ninety foot mural. This project is open to the public, and will take place from 10 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. both days, at 410 and 420 Lincoln Road, directly in front of the FIU College of Architecture + the Arts.

“We are honored to be a part of this wonderful collaboration between the Wyland Foundation, the Arts and Culture Council and Miami-Dade Public Schools,” said Brian Schriner, Dean of FIU College of Architecture and the Arts.  “Hosting the live mural painting in front our Miami Beach Urban Studios is precisely the vision behind establishing this space as a creative environment that ultimately contributes to the good of our community.”

We invite the public to join us as we conduct this important undertaking – from the first brush strokes to the finishing touches.   Art, conservation, education and fun will come together in a highly visible and memorable production.  For two days, the artist and the students of Miami Beach will paint this gigantic mural, right on Lincoln Road Mall.

 

In advance of the live painting, Wyland will conceptualize the work in his studio, producing a painting that will then be recreated with the students in the form of a large mural consisting of two panels. The panels (each measuring ten feet tall and forty five feet wide) will depict indigenous marine life of South Florida. This unique painted homage to Miami Beach and its natural habitat will help remind us of the fragile aspect of nature, and the importance of environmental conservation.

 

Wyland’s accomplishments are prolific –from his iconic artwork portraying idyllic oceanic scenes, to his important foundation that promotes water conservation worldwide.  Globally recognized for his work with large-scale murals, Wyland’s work is held in private collections and public places in over a hundred countries.  His public works are viewed by an estimated one billion people each year.

 

The educational component of this project is key – each of the six Miami Beach public schools will participate, as well as the Hebrew Academy, with the fourth-grade students helping paint the murals.  Additionally, prior to the event, the schools will participate in the Wyland Foundation “Mayors’ Challenge” for conservation.  During the month of April, students are working in their science class to collect and conserve rain water, in water barrels decorated with a Wyland design, which will be used to irrigate the schools’ gardens.

 

“We are thrilled with this opportunity to partner with such an important artist and conservationist.  Wyland and his Wyland Foundation provide a great platform to help communicate the mission of our Arts and Culture Council,” stated Jerry Libbin, President of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce and Miami Beach City Commissioner. ” And, the great part of this project is that it touches the lives of so many young folks in a meaningful way and incorporates Art, Culture and Education.”

 

This project will achieve many wonderful benefits- not only the involvement and education of the Miami Beach students, but it will create a means to raise funds for three pertinent charities –each of which will receive one third of the revenues.  The completed murals can be purchased for $50,000 each, with all proceeds benefiting these charities that support the environment, public education and the arts. Signed lithographs of the murals along with branded t-shirts will also be sold to raise funds.

 

Perhaps our greatest desired outcome for this project is to showcase to residents of Miami Beach, and to the general public, that we encourage the arts and conservation; and that we actively support educational efforts in our community.   We are honored and proud to work with Wyland and his Foundation – with the hope that through this project, more of our children will nurture their artistic talents, and gain a deeper understanding of the importance of conservation.

 

The partnership between the Arts and Culture Council and the Wyland organization is founded on much generosity by all of the team members, in particular as the artist and his Foundation team, who are donating much of their personal time, and project costs.  We thank Wyland for sharing his vision, his talents, and in demonstrating leadership and commitment to the future of our planet.

Beauty at the Bass – More than a Pretty Facade

The Bass Museum of Art is the iconic bright and shiny diamond of the metro Miami art world.  Rising majestically from its glorious location on Collins Avenue, it represents all that Miami has become in the milieu of fine art and innovative programming.

Located on the site originally built to house the Miami Beach Public Library and Art Center, the building was designed in 1930 by Russell Pancoast, grandson of Miami Beach pioneer John A. Collins.  First opening its doors in 1963, The Bass Museum displayed a private collection of Renaissance and Baroque works of art that was donated to the City of Miami Beach by John and Johanna Bass. Vastly evolving from its founding collection, the Bass Museum of Art currently offers a dynamic year-round calendar of exhibitions exploring the connections between contemporary art and works of art from its permanent collection of Renaissance and Baroque paintings, sculpture, textiles, Apulian Vessel Gallery and Egyptian Gallery. Artists’ projects, educational programs, lectures, and free family days complement the works on view.

 

Architect Arata Isozaki designed an addition to the museum between 1998 and 2002 that doubled its size from 15,000 to 35,000 square feet.  Most recently, the museum selected internationally acclaimed Oppenheim Architecture + Design to lead its first phase of design and renovation tied to the 2010 completion of Miami Beach’s Collins Park. Oppenheim redesigned and relocated the museum’s arrival area to flow from and into the new park on Collins Avenue.
Today, the museum thrives under the leadership of Board of Director President George Lindemann, and Silvia Karman Cubiñá, Executive Director and Chief Curator.   

 

With a mission “to inspire and educate by exploring the connections between our historical collections and contemporary art,” Silvia Karman Cubina reflects that “all art was once contemporary and inversely, that all contemporary works of art are part of a continuum of art history.”

Exhibitions at the Bass Museum present art in dynamic conversations spanning time, history and cultures. Their educational programs demonstrate that art is a catalyst for creativity and positive growth, especially in the area of early childhood education. The museum provides affordable resources for the teaching community, based on sound scholarship.

Education through art is paramount for our future.  At the Bass Museum, education is highlighted through some very innovative programs that allow adults and children as young as two years old to appreciate art and learn about its importance in our lives.

The Lindemann Family Creativity Center was inaugurated in the Museum in January of this year. “Finally, we have a place to experiment, essentially create a laboratory for artistic experiments, where teachers, parents and children can be inspired to solve design problems and stimulate their imaginative energies. The specially designed work tables and art equipment make this classroom space unique in South Florida,” George Lindemann.

The Lindemann Family Creativity Center is the home of the museum’s IDEA@thebass programs of art classes and workshops.

IDEA@thebass stands for Identify, Discuss, Envision, Assess.
Developed in conjunction with  Stanford University’s acclaimed Institute of Design, IDEA classes employ a method of teaching known as  Design Thinking, an open ended method of problem solving that allows children to brainstorm, work in teams and engage in creative play.
Doodle 4 Google
Doodle 4 Google is a national competition for K-12 students, to create their own Google doodle (the logo that appears daily on Google’s homepage).  Over 100,000 students participated in 2011.

In late February, local students were provided tools (crayons and watercolors) to create artwork for this contest.
The Bass Museum will showcase the five Florida finalists’ art work during the month of June.  On June 24, coinciding with IDEA@thebass monthly family day, there will be a reception to honor these talented young artists.

 

Never too young…never too old

“Bass babies” and “bass buddies,” launched in February, are programs designed for young children (ages two through four, and four through six, respectively).  These sessions are held semi-monthly throughout the spring, and are led by a Montessori teacher utilizing art as the outlet for creativity and positive reinforcement.

 

The Creativity Center is also offers Art Club for Adults, lectures, film screenings, and teacher training workshops. Additional children’s programs include pre-school art classes, after school, weekend and summer classes for children. The Children’s Trust Network will provide scholarships to those that qualify.

Furthering art education for all ages is vital – bravo to the Bass Museum for its wonderful contributions to our community.

 

 


Admission to the museum and the Lindemann Family Creativity Center: Free for Miami Beach residents.  Cost for non-residents: adults $8, children and students $6, and children under 6 are free.  Museum hours, Wednesday through Sunday, noon until 5:00 p.m. Reservations are not required.



Bass Museum of Art, 2100 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach FL 33139, www.bassmuseum.org, 305.673.7530